Charlie Robison’s Beautiful Day Out June 23rd On Dualtone Records

TCB note: We’ll be having a contest soon for a copy of Charlie’s newest! Stay tuned for details!

March 9, 2008 – Throughout his career, Charlie Robison has forged his own path within the country music world. His dynamic and hard-charging performing style has made him a Lone State favorite as well as an extraordinary popular national country-rock attraction.

Robison’s last album and label debut for Dualtone Records, Good Times, solidified his position in country music as one of Texas’ finest songwriters. Good Times racked up the best sales of his career, and the video for the single “El Cerrito Place” was a Top 10 Hit on the CMT Network.

It’s been a long wait for his fans, but Robison will finally return on June 23rd with a new album titled Beautiful Day. The ten-track release includes “Reconsider,” “Down Again,” “Nothin Better To Do,” and the title track.

In what now may seem rather ironic, Robison’s last album found him celebrating wedded and domestic contentment as a husband to Emily of The Dixie Chicks and father of son Gus and twins Juliana and Henry. Now, five years later Robison’s new album explores his divorce from Emily, which was finalized in August of last year.

It’s only natural to label this is his “divorce album,” which is not altogether untrue. Beautiful Day is a musical and emotional journey that travels through a vivid landscape of feelings and moods from certain places to other ones new and wholly different. Like such certified classics as Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks and Willie Nelson’s Phases & Stages, its narrative center is the end of Robison’s marriage.

While their divorce was amicable, the experience still wasn’t an easy one for him, as the end of any profound love is bound to be. “When I was writing this record, I was going through the quintessential divorce thing of living in a one-bedroom apartment in downtown San Antonio across from the bus station,” Robison recalls. “When it’s over, it’s over.”

But as with all devoted songwriters, Robison writes from a perspective that draws from and speaks to larger matters and issues within human experience and life in these times.
Beautiful Day chronicles the processes and resulting growth one goes through and finally the redemption to be found within such a major life event. And it reflects a change in approach is the way Robison writes his songs.

“In the past most of my songs were stories written from a third-person perspective,” he explains. “This is the first album where I’m writing in the first person. It wasn’t like I did it by design; I didn’t have any choice. Although the order of the songs on the album is more musical than following any storyline, as you hear the record you’ll know what was going on with the divorce,” Charlie admits.

Yet unlike too many divorces, where rancor and pointed anger is a key part of the mix of feelings, this story is one of two people who love each other and their children, but due to their situations, themselves and the demands of their careers, the marriage is no longer tenable. And that’s what makes Beautiful Day another significant creative work about divorce with a different tale to tell than any other.

The distinctly different nature of this break-up is clear from the opening title track, with its upbeat vibe, tempo and theme, albeit tinted with a slightly sardonic edge. And by the time one reaches the final number, Robison’s decidedly Texan reading of Bruce Springsteen’s classic “Racing in the Streets,” an exhilarating sense of freedom and new beginnings is at hand.

Beautiful Day is also a musical departure for Robison as his first self-produced album, recorded at his brother Bruce’s Austin studio, Premium Recording Service. The vibrant electric guitar work throughout is by artist in his own right as well as producer Charlie Sexton, while the acoustic guitars that fill out the sound are by Robert Earl Keen’s guitarist and producer Rich Brotherton. Longtime Robison sideman Kim Deschamps brings the colors of his steel guitar and mandolin to the mix, while the bottom end is held down with grooving solidity by the veteran rhythm section of Robison’s backing band The Enablers, bassist Scott Eebeck and drummer Keith Robinson.

“I’ve wanted for a long time to make a record that sounds like a great American rock band,” explains Robison. And just as Beautiful Day closes one emotional chapter in his life and opens another, it’s also an album on which his always strong rock’n’roll leanings come to the fore to transcend his country roots, while also bringing them along, to create a sound that is simply great American music.

All told, it’s an album of deep and rich emotional and musical content that anyone who has ever lived, loved and lost can find themselves within as well as experience what Charlie Robison has been through. And all of us, the artist included, find a redemption and the prospect of new beginnings by the time the record ends, and find ourselves better, wiser and stronger thanks to it.

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